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Graduate Faculty

View descriptions of the areas of study these faculty supervise at the graduate level.

Jordanna Bailkin
Professor, Jere L. Bacharach Endowed Professor in International Studies
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    Students may work with Professor Bailkin in British, French, or European Cultural History. A field in British history would include the social, political, and cultural history of Britain (including Ireland) and Empire from the eighteenth century to the present. Students will develop subfields on major historiographical questions such as the development of the welfare state, race and immigration, urban identity, gender and the family, "four nations" approaches to British history, and the impact of decolonization on the metropole. A field in French history will place particular emphasis on late-19th and 20th-century France. Students will develop subfields on topics such as the state's treatment of prostitution, natalism and the First World War, and French identity after the European Union. Students pursuing a field in European Cultural History may approach this field by examining the individuals, institutions, and ideologies that have contributed to major cultural currents in modern Europe, including the production of the categories of "high" and "mass" culture and the social and political impact of new visual and literary traditions. This subfield will also trace the development of cultural history through and beyond the linguistic turn.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Colonialisms)*

    Students may work with Professor Bailkin on fields of study encompassing Comparative Gender and/or Comparative Colonialisms. A field in Comparative gender will incorporate a comparative approach to the history of women and gender. Students will develop fields on major historiographical questions such as the development of protective family legislation in Europe and the United States and the globalization of feminism. Students pursuing a field in Comparative Colonialisms will examine England's economic, political, military, and cultural treatment of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales compared to its overseas dominions. We will consider the relationship between "white" and "non-white" colonies as part of the larger racial politics of European colonialism.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Jordanna Bailkin's complete profile

Professor George Behlmer
Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    Graduate study in the "Modern Britain" field will focus on the social, cultural, and political dimensions of British history from the advent of industrialization (circa 1760) through the Second World War. Within this broad time period, students will develop expertise in several historiographic themes. These themes, in turn, will be established through negotiation between the student and the field supervisor. Examples of themes negotiated with current and former graduate students include the following: the Victorian missionary movement; law and working-class culture; the authority of medicine; feminism and militancy; the policing of manners; and British responses to Irish revolutionary challenges.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Colonialisms)*

    This field will focus on the process by which Great Britain acquired and subsequently relinquished the world's most extensive colonial empire. The chronological focus here is from 1781 through the 1970s. Its territorial focus will be on British colonial policies in the Pacific and the Caribbean, as well as on the tortured colonial relationship with Ireland.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


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Photo of Arbella Bet-Shlimon
Assistant Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Africa & the Middle East

    Modern Middle East: In this field, students will aim to develop general proficiency in the political, social, and economic history of the Middle East—currently conceived as the Arab World, Turkey, and Iran, and more broadly conceived as Southwest Asia and North Africa—from the 19th century to the present. This field will focus on the following topics: nation building, state formation, and associated political discourses; Western colonialism, neocolonialism, and neoimperialism in the Middle East and North Africa; the decline and fall of the Ottoman Empire; the formation and influence of key ideologies such as Arab nationalism, Sunni and Shiite Islamisms, and Zionism; wars, diplomacy, and refugee crises; and coups and revolutions. Students are expected to demonstrate familiarity with historiographical trends in the study of the modern Middle East in addition to an understanding of historical events and themes.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Colonialisms)

    Comparative Colonialisms in the Modern Middle East: In this field, students will examine the various forms that colonialism and imperialism have taken in the Middle East (Southwest Asia and North Africa) since the 19th century in comparative perspective. Topics to be covered include: the growth and decline of American, British, French, and Portuguese imperial enterprises in the Middle East; the League of Nations and the mandate system; British protectorates in the Persian Gulf region; empires centered in the Middle East region, such as the Ottoman Empire and Oman; settlements and expulsions; and the development and decline of monarchies.


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Professor Elena Campbell
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Russia and Central Asia

    Professor Campbell's current research interests concern empire, religion and nationalism in late Imperial Russia.

    A graduate field will include a variety of topics in Russian history from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. The content of the field and the specific focus of graduate study will be determined through consultation with the professor.

    Students will be expected to read major works in Imperial Russian history and be familiar with the current state of the field. Students who are choosing Russian history as their primary area of study must acquire a reading knowledge of Russian and any other language relevant to their research.


    View Elena I. Campbell's complete profile

Professor Purnima Dhavan
Associate Professor, Director of Graduate Studies, Howard and Frances Keller Endowed Professor in History
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Asia--Pre-History to the Present

    Graduate students preparing a field in the history of South Asia 1200-1800 will be expected to gain a broad familiarity with the history of the Sultanate and Mughal period in addition to the histories of various regional dynasties. The social, cultural, and political history of the period is emphasized and includes state formation and the emergence and transformation of caste and ethnic identity, religious traditions, warrior and peasant cultures, trading networks, and intellectual traditions.

    Students will create a specialized course of study in consultation with the professor. Proficiency in one South Asian language and/or Persian is required for students who wish to pursue a primary specialization in this field. Students who select this as a secondary field need not have knowledge of a South Asian language.

    Division: Comparative History (Historiography & Comparative Gender)*

    Students preparing a field in Historiography will study the impact of modern historical theories and methodologies on our understanding of early modern South Asian history including nationalist, feminist, marxist, and subaltern modes of analysis. The course of study in the field will also explore oral traditions, mythological concepts of time, memory and history in textual sources and art from the early modern period.

    A field in Comparative Gender in South Asia from 1200-1800 will examine the construction of gender in early modern South Asia and its specific interactions with caste, social class, and ethnicity. Readings will focus on the construction of gender in courtly, warrior, ascetic, and mystical traditions in the early modern period as well as the considerable body of theoretical and methodological debates about the history of gender put forward by modern scholars.


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Madeleine Yue Dong
Professor, Joint Appointment: Jackson School of International Studies
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Asia--Pre-History to the Present

    Students preparing this field will consider China in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including social, cultural, gender, urban history.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Gender & Comparative Ethnicity & Nationalism)*

    Students preparing a field in Comparative Gender will consider the transformation and reconstruction of gender boundaries and identities through political, social, and cultural discourses and practices. Students preparing a field in Comparative Ethnicity and Nationalism will study China from an empire to a nation state, and formation/transformation of regional, ethnic, gender, and class identities in the process, as well as Chinese nationalism and revolutions and their relations to imperialism and colonialism.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


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Patricia Ebrey
Professor, Williams Family Endowed Professor in History
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Asia--Pre-History to the Present

    Graduate students preparing a field in Early Imperial China are expected to gain a broad familiarity with the history of the period sufficient to prepare them to teach undergraduate survey courses covering Chinese history from its beginnings through the Song dynasty (that is, to 1279 CE). In addition, they should acquire more detailed knowledge of a specific time period (such as a dynasty) and a specific type of history (such as social, cultural, intellectual, political, economic, or gender). Emphasis is placed on command of the English language literature on the subject, and students should submit a list of 75-100 books and articles that they will have read.

    Students preparing early Chinese history as a secondary field need not have Chinese language competence and can select any time period and specialty. Students wishing to do their dissertations in this field must have strong Chinese language skills and are encouraged to work in the Tang or Song periods.


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Professor James Felak
Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    Students choosing East European History as their primary area of study will cover the lands and peoples of the region roughly comprising today's Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia from 1780 to 1989, and the Balkans from 1804. Students are required to take a graduate field course on Modern Eastern Europe, a 400 level survey on the history of Eastern Europe, and at least one quarter of directed readings. Such students must also acquire a reading knowledge of two European languages pertinent to their study, one of them an East European language not including German or Russian.

    Students doing East European History as a secondary area of study may choose one of the following:

    • East Central Europe from 1780 to 1989
    • the Balkans from 1804 to 1989
    • Eastern Europe in the 20th Century
    • Poland from 1772 to 1989
    • Nationalism in Eastern Europe
    • Communism in Eastern Europe
    • Religion in Eastern Europe

    Such students must take a graduate course on Modern Eastern Europe and a 400 level survey on the history of Eastern Europe.

    It may be possible to negotiate additional sub-fields as they suit student needs and interests.


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Professor John Findlay
Professor
Erasmo Gamboa
Associate Professor
Professor Christoph Giebel
Associate Professor, Joint Appointment: Jackson School of International Studies
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Asia--Pre-History to the Present

    Professor Giebel offers fields covering the material and human history of Viet Nam from the beginnings to the present. Students focusing on the period before 1800 will emphasize local cultures and early kingdoms through the study of religion, architecture, art, archaeology, economics, ecology, and textual studies (literature, laws, chronicles, and oral traditions). Students working in the modern period will focus on the social, political, cultural and economic changes in Viet Nam from 1800 to the present. Emphasizes the growth of staes, imperialism, nationalism, the transformations of modernity, independence and the challenges of gendered, ethnic, and religious identities in the post-colonial world.


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Susan A. Glenn
Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: United States History

    Students may emphasize the cultural and/or social history of the U.S. in the long twentieth century (since the l870s). Topics of study include immigration and ethnic group life, social and political movements, women and gender, race relations, expressive and popular culture.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Gender & Comparative Ethnicity & Nationalism)*

    A field in comparative gender with Professor Glenn will emphasize the history and historiography of gender and women's history. Areas of study include the relationship between gender and race, ethnicity, nationalism, class, and social movements as well as the significance of gender ideology in the production and consumption of expressive and popular culture. Comparisons will focus on the U.S. and another geographic area (in conjunction with another faculty member).

    Students may also work with Professor Glenn on a sub-field of Comparative Ethnicity and Nationalism with a focus on Jewish history/identity/ethnicity; Jews, Blacks, and the racial imaginary in the American and European contexts.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Susan A. Glenn's complete profile

Adjunct Faculty
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Ancient Mediterranean & Late Antique Near East*

    The particular field or topic in Roman history will be determined in consultation with me and with an eye to the particular needs, interests, and experience level of the student. Students will be expected to choose, however, an area that complements (and does not necessarily duplicate or overlap with) other fields while adding a useful dimension to their teaching or research profile. Past fields have included imperialism in the Roman Republic, the development and role of the Imperial senate, the senate of the Roman Republic, and the Republican aristocracy.

    Division: Comparative History (Historiography)**

    The particular area in which I am prepared to offer a field exam is Greek and Roman historiography. The parameters and limits of this field will be determined by the student's preparation and needs. In all instances, however, students will be expected to read both primary texts (some experience with either Latin or Greek is desirable or, depending on circumstances, required) and secondary texts. Particular attention will be paid to relevant theoretical works on the nature of historiography.

    *Adjunct faculty do not normally supervise first fields.

    **Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Alain M. Gowing's complete profile

James Gregory
Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: United States History

    My graduate teaching fields are tailored to the individual interests of students. We will work out precise subject areas and reading lists as we proceed. Subject to those negotiations, students generally choose one of the following concentrations:

    Twentieth Century U.S.

    I prefer to treat this as a broad field that covers the full chronological sweep of the century. Students will read widely, developing a modest familiarity with the literature on a large number of subjects (including politics, culture, foreign relations, race, gender, labor, region, urban). Depending upon interests, certain issues and time periods will be developed in more depth.

    Class, Race, Labor, and Political Economy

    This concentration joins the subject of American political economy with those of labor history and race/ethnic formation covering both the 19th and the 20th centuries.

    Regions, Migration, Immigration

    This concentration explores place and mobility in American history with readings that examine how place identities and regional political economies have been formed and maintained and how migrations (both from abroad and internal) reshape places and people.


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Bruce Hevly
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: History of Science

    History of Science

    A general field, designed to begin preparation of graduate students aiming to teach undergraduate courses or pursue research in history of science during their careers, and to introduce the general historiographical framework and development of the field. The field can be modified to meet the student's particular interests. This would normally be the second field for students interested in becoming historians of science.

    Science and Technology Studies

    "STS" engages in the variety of new approaches to understanding the sciences which have emerged in the wake of Thomas Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962). Drawing from diverse academic disciplines, such as philosophy, sociology, and anthropology, scholars in the 1970s and 80s developed powerful and controversial new methods of analyzing science as a social construction or network, and critiqued the role of gender and race in scientific practice, theory, and organization. More recently, cultural and anthropological studies of science have presented new means to interpret science alongside alternative systems of human (and even 'non-human'!) action and belief. Postcolonial studies of science and technology have traced science's interactions with empire, development, and indigenous knowledges. Students taking this field will engage with these diverse approaches of recent STS through reading, writing, and discussions. A knowledge of the tools and concepts of STS has been indispensable for recent history of science, and the field will deepen and broaden participants' perspectives on science.

    History of Technology

    A general field, designed to begin preparation for graduate students aiming to teach undergraduate courses or pursue research in history of technology during their careers, and to introduce the general historiographical frameworks and development of the field. The field can be modified to meet the student's particular interests; in the past, students interested in environmental and western history have been important members of the seminar.

    History of Physics

    Introduction to the literature, practices, and current problems in the study of the emergence and development of physics since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Professor Hevly has particular interests in nineteenth-century British and twentieth-century American cases, but other concentrations are possible as well.

    History of Terrestrial Physics

    This is a more specialized field, which aims to explore the history of terrestrial physics as an alternative to the standard view in history of modern physics which has focused on the reductionist program of atomic and sub-atomic sciences. Topics include various studies since the eighteenth century: terrestrial magnetism and electricity, auroral studies, glaciology and ice caps, ocean sciences, studies of the upper atmosphere. Also considers expeditionary science, and developing connections between science and state.

    Science, Technology and the Military

    Exploration of the institutional, cultural and conceptual relationships between science, technology and the military components of that state since the early modern period. This field centers on the modern military as a set of self-consciously technologically-conditioned communities, and on science and technology as constrained by the aspirations, commitments and structures of the modern state. Depending on the student's area of interest, the field may also be oriented towards issues of science and gender, cyborgia, space programs, or other issues of interest. Professor Hevly's particular interest is the development of intellectual systems to enlist the Earth into reliably-functioning technological systems.

    Division: United States

    History of Science and Technology in American Culture

    This field is designed to explore science and technology in the context of American social, cultural, or intellectual history. Undertaking sufficient comparative history to justify claims about American peculiarities, the field will look for the ways in which American contexts since the seventeenth century influenced the content and construction of science and technology. It might be particularly appropriate for American historians interested in ways to integrate the history of science and technology into research and teaching programs in the broader field.


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Richard Johnson
Professor Emeritus
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: United States History

    United States: Early American history

    The field encompasses the history of North America from its beginnings to around 1790. It centers on the 17th and 18th centuries and the emergence of what became the United States, but may be broadened or sharpened to encourage study of such topics as race relations, labor systems, reformed religion, comparative revolutions and state-formation, and the shaping of an early modern Atlantic world--or other such topics as would help students to further their overall research and teaching goals. Students undertaking this field will generally be required to master its main themes, materials, and methodological approaches by completing HSTAA 501, the early American field course offered each fall quarter. They would then further define their particular interests within the field in preparation for the examination through consultation with the supervising faculty and a course of directed readings.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Colonialisms)*

    The field centers on the colonialisms of the early modern world, and particularly those that developed in the Americas between the 15th and 19th centuries. It gives particular attention to such issues as the value and methodology of comparative history, the theory and practice of empire, core and periphery interactions, race relations, slave and bound labor, and the development of staple economies and settler societies. Students would be expected to take the relevant courses offered by faculty in the early modern field; and then work with the supervising faculty to define their particular interests in the field and take one or more credit/non-credit courses of directed reading and writing.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


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Raymond Jonas
Professor, Colonel Donald W. Wiethuechter, USA Ret., Endowed Faculty Fellow in History
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    Europe and the Modern World

    This field aims to provide a familiarity with some of the great themes, problems, and events in the history of modern Europe, including but not limited to Europe’s larger global engagements. It offers a foundation for advanced study of a thematic or regional nature, a basis for comparative historical study within Europe and beyond, and preparation for the teaching of entry-level and advanced undergraduate surveys in the field.

    Students preparing Europe and the Modern World as a graduate field should take the graduate field course (HSTEU 513) and at least one other graduate level course under my supervision.

    Modern France

    This field aims to provide a serviceable familiarity with the history of France from the Revolution of 1789 to the present. For much of the period--at least until 1945--France was regarded not only as a great power, but as the hub of global modernity in such diverse domains as architecture, art, political culture, philosophy, science, and fashion. An understanding of French politics and culture in these years is fundamental to the study of modern Europe and much of the world.

    France was home to claims of universal human rights; it was also, paradoxically, the home to a global empire, touching Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Thus, the French field serves as a foundation for advanced study of one of the great national histories of continental Europe, but it also serves as the basis for comparative historical study within Europe and beyond.

    Students preparing Modern France as a graduate field should take the graduate field course (HSTEU 521) and at least one other graduate level course under my supervision.


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Professor Moon-Ho Jung
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: United States

    The field of Asian American history encompasses a broad range of topics and methodologies that often cross disciplinary and geopolitical boundaries. Students pursuing this field are expected to read widely and critically, with an emphasis on historiographical shifts and debates. In particular, they will investigate how the field has evolved over time and challenged and reproduced traditional narratives of U.S. history. Students are also encouraged to converse with a vibrant community of faculty and graduate students specializing in Asian American Studies at UW.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Ethnicity & Nationalism)*

    Students will explore how race and nation have been articulated in U.S. history, framed theoretically and globally. Students may choose to emphasize particular time periods, theoretical approaches, and geopolitical frameworks as they study how racial concepts, representations, and practices shaped American national identities. Possible topics of concentration include whiteness, imperialism, labor migration, and transnational social movements.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


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Adjunct Faculty
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times*

    Students working with Professor Leiren may prepare a field in modern Scandinavian history, including political, social, or cultural topics. Topics may focus on a single Scandinavian/Nordic country (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway or Sweden) or examine two or more countries in a comparative context. Topics may include nationalism and national identity, social and political developments, the welfare state, emigration, and the roles of small nations. Depending on the specific topic of study chosen, the ability to work with one or more of the Scandinavian/Nordic languages may be required.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Ethnicity & Nationalism)**

    A field in Comparative Ethnicity and Nationalism with Professor Leiren emphasizes the development of nationalism and national identity in Scandinavia. The development of national myths and literatures along with the formal codification of languages are possible topics in this field. Within a sub-field in Scandinavian-American history, ethnicity and immigrant culture may be examined within the context of issues of whiteness, power, or ethnic identity.

    *Adjunct faculty do not normally supervise first fields.

    **Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Terje I. Leiren's complete profile

Laurie Marhoefer
Assistant Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    Students preparing this field with Professor Marhoefer will study the social, cultural, and political history of Germany, German-speaking Europe, and Germany’s global colonial empire from the late eighteenth century to the present. Work on the major field will introduce students to important historiographical problems, such as those regarding Germany’s development into a modern nation state across the nineteenth century, the history of German Jews from the eighteenth century to the present, the development of feminism in Germany and the various paths that German feminists took in their search for justice, German imperialism, gay and trans liberation movements in German-speaking Europe from the nineteenth century to the present, the rise, fall, and long aftermath of Nazism, the rise and fall of German communism, and state violence and genocide in German history.

    Division: Comparative History--Comparative Gender & Comparative Ethnicity and Nationalism*

    A field in comparative gender directed by Professor Marhoefer will examine the transnational histories of gender and sexuality, as well as the closely related histories of class, race, and empire, especially within modern Europe and its colonies. A field in the comparative history of ethnicity and nationalism will investigate notions of race, national identity, and ethnic identity together with the closely related histories of gender, sexuality, and class, in the context of modern Germany and modern Europe. Students are encouraged to design fields that will serve their research interests.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


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Professor Matthew Mosca
Assistant Professor, Joint Appointment: Jackson School of International Studies
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Asia--Pre-History to the Present

    Graduate students taking a field in Late Imperial Chinese History will develop a general knowledge of the Ming and Qing periods (1368-1912), the development of relevant historiography, particularly in English, and specialized expertise in one or more subfields. The field will cover both China and Inner Asia. A reading list will be determined in consultation with the instructor.  Students for whom Late Imperial China is their primary field will be expected to command at least literary and modern Chinese in order to develop research proficiency. Students taking this as a secondary field are not required to know Chinese.


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Devin Naar with Ladino artifact
Associate Professor, Isaac Alhadeff Professor of Sephardic Studies, Sephardic Studies Program Chair
Professor Hwasook Nam
Associate Professor, Joint Appointment: Jackson School of International Studies, James B. Palais Endowed Associate Professor in Korea Studies
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Asia--Pre-History to the Present

    Students preparing a field in modern Korean history will consider the social, cultural, political, and gender history of Korea in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis on the colonial period and post-WWII nation building.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Colonialisms)*

    Students preparing a field in Comparative Colonialisms with Professor Nam will focus on Western, Chinese, and Japanese imperialisms and colonial practices in Korea and in other parts of Asia (Manchuria, in particular) in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and their relations to the rise of modern nation states and ethnic nationalism in North and South Korea.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


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Linda Nash
Associate Professor, Director, Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest, John Calhoun Smith Memorial Endowed Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: United States

    U.S. Environmental History

    As a field of scholarship, environmental history focuses on the reciprocal interactions between human societies and the natural world, the changing ways in which those interactions have been mediated by cultural and political forms, and the emergence of “the environment” as an object of knowledge and concern.  It also seeks to challenge the neglect of materials and materiality in other fields of history.  Chronologically the field ranges from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Students are expected to engage methodological and theoretical issues (e.g., the spatial turn, actor-network theory, the “new materialism”) and to familiarize themselves with key historical themes and selected interdisciplinary approaches. Within that broad framework, possible topics of specialization include environment and empire, urban environmental history, gender and race, the history and production of environmental knowledge, environmental politics, consumption and consumerism, the environmental history of bodies and health, the environmental history of technology and infrastructure. It is also possible to construct an environmental history field that is geographically comparative and/or that engages relevant literature in geography, anthropology, or another related discipline.

    Western U.S.

    History of the trans-Mississippi West, emphasizing social and cultural history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In addition, students are expected to address the methodological issues posed by regional (versus national and transnational) approaches to history. Among the possible emphases are nineteenth-century colonialism, race and racial ideology, women and gender, environment and land use, representations of the West, politics and the state.

    Twentieth Century U.S.

    A broad chronological field that covers major developments in social and cultural history and politics since 1880.


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Chair and Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Ancient Mediterranean & Late Antique Near East*

    A number of fields are possible within this division:

    Biblical History

    (Syro-Palestinian) Israelite history and culture within the context of the greater ancient Near East. Includes knowledge of primary biblical languages.

    Mesopotamian History

    History of the primary peoples and cultures of Mesopotamia from the mid-4th millennium BCE until the Hellenistic period. Includes knowledge of primary langauges of Mesopotamia.

    Ancient Egyptian History

    History of ancient Egypt from the mid-4th millennium BCE until the Ptolemaic period. Includes knowledge of hieroglyphic Egyptian.

    History of Biblical Exegesis

    This history of biblical exegesis (Hebrew Bible=Old Testament) frrom canonization until today.

    History of the Semitic Languages

    Comparative history of the primary Semitic languages and their dialects.

    **Adjunct professors do not normally supervise first fields.


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Professor Margaret O'Mara
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: United States

    Twentieth Century

    Development of the United States during the "very long" twentieth century, from 1877 to the present, with particular emphasis on the changing relationship between state and society, economic and technological shifts, and struggles for civil and economic rights.

    Urban History

    Urbanization and the suburbanization of the United States from the colonial era to the present, including consideration of comparative examples from outside the US. Students will read seminal works from the urban historiography and key contributions to the field from social history, intellectual history, and political history, as well as from the disciplines of urban planning, public policy, and sociology.

    Policy and Political History

    Development of the American state and political culture, with particular emphasis on the twentieth century. Readings will consider the role of the federal government, contested and dynamic definitions of citizenship, expansion and contraction of the national state, the role of extra-governmental institutions, and grassroots activism on the left and the right.

    History of Capitalism

    Development of capitalism as a political economic form in the United States and globally since the early nineteenth century.  Readings will be both historiographic (examining the evolution of economic and business history and changing interpretations of the role of market institutitions in society) and thematic (addressing topics such as: the state-market relationship, business organization and power, labor and capital, economic globalization, technological change, economic thought and policy, the effect of economic structures on individual and group opportunity and mobility).


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Mary O'Neil
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    Professor O'Neil offers fields in Renaissance Italy, the Counter Reformation, and the Social History of Early Modern Europe, including Society and Religion in the Reformation. She will also offer European Witch Trials as a topic, though not as a separate field.


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Professor Vicente Rafael
Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Asia--Pre-History to the Present

    This field is constructed with an emphasis on island Southeast Asia and the Philippines from 1521 to the present.

    Division: United States History

    Asian American socio-cultural histories, with an emphasis on Filipino Americans and Filipino overseas workers

    Division: Comparative History (Historiography, Comparative Ethnicity & Nationalism, and Comparative Colonialisms)*

    A field in Comparative Historiography will include Nationalist and postcolonial conceptions of history, deconstruction, critical theory especially as these relate to the politics of translation, religion, and media technologies. A field in Comparative Colonialisms will carry a focus on United States and Spanish imperialism in Asia and the Pacific. The field in Comparative Nationalism and Ethnicity focuses on the historical and technological conditions for the rise of nationhood, as well as the role of mass media, translation and the languages of power in nationalist discourses.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


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Joshua L. Reid
Associate Professor
Ileana Rodriguez-Silva
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Latin America

    Students working in Latin America with Professor Rodriguez-Silva will learn about the social and cultural histories of Latin America and the Caribbean, especially during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While students will follow the topic and area of their choosing, they are expected to master the main historiographical and methodological debates within this field. Major topics of analysis are the multiple forms of colonialism and imperialism, forced labor systems, processes of nation-state formation, race and ethnicity, migration and diaspora communities, and, most importantly, subaltern politics.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Gender & Comparative Colonialisms)*

    In preparing a field in Comparative Gender with Professor Rodriguez-Silva, students will learn about the history of women, the historical shifts in definitions of womanhood and masculinity among the diverse populations of Latin America and the Caribbean, and the crucial role of sexuality in the political and economic organization of colonial and national states. Students may also prepare a field in Comparative Colonialism, in which they will analyze the multiple forms of and the historical transformations in colonial relations established in the Americas since pre-Columbian times to the present.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Ileana Rodriguez-Silva's complete profile

Professor William Rorabaugh
Professor, Dio Richardson Endowed Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: United States

    Professor Rorabaugh regularly offers the following graduate fields in US History:

    1. 19th Century U.S.
    2. 20th Century U.S.
    3. U.S. Social

    The exact content of the field must be negotiated between the instructor and the graduate student. If the field is a student's primary field, it will be both broader and deeper than if the field is a secondary field. The field ought to complement but not unduly overlap other fields.

    Normally, students are expected to take HSTAA 521, the 19c field course, as entering grad students, and this reading list, except for students doing a 20c field, forms the basis for a reading list for a field either in 19c US or in US Social History. The instructor usually offers HSTAA 590 each fall so that students might make further preparations in their specific field. Directed readings in the form of HIST 600 are also common for preparing a field. Occasionally, the instructor has allowed a student to construct a special field in US History apart from the regular fields in 19c US, 20c US, or US Social History.


    View William Rorabaugh's complete profile

Benjamin Schmidt
Professor, Giovanni and Amne Costigan Endowed Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    Professor Schmidt offers a field covering the social, political, and especially cultural history of Europe from around the mid-fifteenth century through the mid-eighteenth century. Topics vary from year to year, and students tend to play a considerable part in shaping their own programs of study. Recent graduate seminars have examined courts and court culture; habits of collecting and the practice of early modern "science"; Europe's encounter with the Americas; the expansion of early modern geography and the culture of curiosity; the history of reading, literacy, and the book; visual culture in early modern Europe. Europe's engagement with the non-European world is also included in the field: early modern expansion, colonialism, and globalism.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Colonialisms)*

    Students may work with Professor Schmidt to develop a field in Comparative Colonialisms that focuses on the early modern world.  This field might focus on the West--the history of the Atlantic World and the colonial (and imperial) enterprises that commenced from ca. 1492--or the to the East, in the latter case considering how European interventions in Asia fit into broader, early modern colonial and imperials trends.  This field would be done from a European perspective, to be sure, yet in a manner that explores how European colonial programs and golbal engagements fit into larger cultural and political developments of the period from ca. 1450-1750.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


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Laurie Sears
Professor, Walker Family Endowed Professor in History
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Asia--Pre-History to the Present

    Professor Sears offers fields covering the material and human history of Indonesia from the beginnings to the present. Students focusing on the period before 1800 will emphasize local cultures and early kingdoms through the study of religion, architecture, art, archaeology, economics, ecology, and textual studies (literature, laws, chronicles, and oral traditions). Students working in the modern period will focus on the social, political, cultural and economic changes in Indonesia from 1800 to the present. Emphasizes the growth of staes, imperialism, nationalism, the transformations of modernity, independence and the challenges of gendered, ethnic, and religious identities in the post-colonial world.

    Division: Comparative History (Historiography & Comparative Colonialisms)*

    The goal of the Historiography field will be to look at the intersection of history and theory through a critical investigation of ideologies, post-modernities, the breakdown of rationalism, and the de-centering effects of postcolonial and feminist theories. How does post-modern critical discourse affect historical studies? What is the fate of history in the postcolonial world? Can one be a feminist, a Marxist, and a post-modernist? (Would one want to be?) By taking an interdisciplinary approach to "culture," theory, and history, this field will blend together a number of different methodologies associated with ethnography, semiotics, Frankfurt school theory, Birmingham school media criticism, feminist theories, Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis, postcolonial theories and deconstruction. The emphasis will be on different ways of "seeing" and how these intersect with changing notions of subjectivity. Each student will construct an individual list of required readings for this field specific to his or her research interests.

    This field in Comparative Colonialisms approaches the comparative study of colonialism by investigating spatial and temporal constructions of modernity and what is sometimes called post-modernity. The field draws novelists, cultural critics, and scholars of Asia and Europe into comparative historical conversations about "non-western studies". Continuing the dialogues with the social sciences that comparative studies have always entailed, this field integrates literary, historiographical, postcolonial, and psychoanalytic theories into these discussions by questioning the development of nations and identities, and the disciplinary constructions of modernity, ethnicity, gender, and culture.

    For the purposes of this field, we will avoid positing a past time of tradition that has been overcome by modernity. Tradition and modernity both come into focus at the same time, and scholars can only recognize tradition in the light of modernity. What becomes known as "culture" comes into focus in the 19th century as colonial empires are consolidated and colonial scholars begin the process of cultural representation that has sometimes been named Orientalism. What we must call culture, for lack of a better term, cannot be separated from the colonial moment and posited as an unchanging part of non-European civilization waiting for Europeans to uncover, interpret, document, or eventually reconstruct it. What social scientists call "tradition" developed within an atmosphere in which 19th century discourses of progress and science were percolating, both contributing and drawing from European, African, and Asian intellectual interactions. This field strives towards a re-envisioning of European and Asian histories by highlighting the mutual exchanges between Asian and European knowledges and mentalities. Each student will construct a different list of required readings for this field specific to his or her research interests.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Laurie Sears's complete profile

Stephanie Smallwood
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Africa & the Middle East

    Students may work with Professor Smallwood to develop a field in African history focused on sub-Saharan Africa in the pre-colonial period. The field broadly encompasses the economic, political, and socio-cultural history of African societies before c. 1880, with special attention to Africa's evolving relationship to the West, and slavery and slave trading both within sub-Saharan Africa and across desert/ocean boundaries. Students will work in consultation with Professor Smallwood to develop a course of study that balances historiographic coverage and thematic/conceptual agendas specific to their individual needs and interests.

    Division: United States

    Students preparing a field in United States history with Professor Smallwood will focus on the territory's social and cultural history in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Major themes students are expected to explore in depth include European exploration, cartographic representation, cultural interactions among Native American, European, and African peoples, and racial slavery.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Colonialisms)*

    Students may work with Professor Smallwood to develop a field in Comparative Colonialisms that focuses on early modern Atlantic history. The field examines European colonial regimes in the Americas, commercial and cultural ties between Europe, Africa, and the Americas, and free and coerced migrations within the Atlantic arena. Special attention is given also to methodological and theoretical discourses relating to the study of comparative history and epistemological critiques of "modernity."

    Students working in this field are encouraged to consult with other appropriate faculty specialists in African history, early modern European history, colonial Latin American history, as well as those offering other specialized fields within the Comparative Colonialisms rubric.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Stephanie Smallwood's complete profile

Robert Stacey
Professor, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    Professor Stacey is a specialist in High and Late Medieval history. He is currently serving as Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, and thus is not available to supervise graduate study. Consequently, the History Department is not currently accepting applications with primary/first fields in Medieval History.

    Applicants interested in preparing a second, third, or fourth field in Medieval history should contact Professor Robin Stacey to discuss the field before submitting an application to our program.


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Professor Robin Stacey
Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

    The History Department is not accepting applications with primary/first fields in any area of Medieval History - Early, High or Late. The Department is accepting applications with second, third or fourth fields in Early Medieval History under the supervision of Professor Robin Stacey.

    One of the fields available to those interested in the history of medieval Europe is "Early Medieval Europe." This field is generally defined as covering western Europe in the period c. 400-1000. (Often students begin their course of study before 400 or end it after 1000: the chronology given here represents a general guideline rather than a universal requirement.) Students preparing an early medieval field will be asked to prepare reading lists (usually done after taking a field course with the instructor) in three or four "subfields." Two of these subfields are normally "Kingship" and "The Church," although the manner in which students approach these topics varies according to the needs of the student involved. Some students may choose, for example, to focus on the institutional aspects of both king and church; others may concentrate instead on issues of ideology and representation. All such matters are worked out individually with the instructor in accordance with the needs of the student.

    In addition to these subfields, students are asked to prepare one or two other subjects for testing. These are defined according to individual preference. Some students choose to focus on chronological or geographical topics (e.g. the Anglo-Saxons, the Viking Age), while some prefer thematic topics (e.g. law, women, sanctity, historiography, urban life, vernacular literatures, etc.). Again, all such decisions are made by the student in consultation with the instructor. Reading lists approved by both student and instructor then serve as the basis for the written (M.A.) or written and oral (Ph.D.) field exam.

    Most field exam reading lists include secondary sources only. A knowledge of the basic primary sources of the period is presumed, but is not generally tested at the exam. Students doing a medieval field might expect that some of their reading will be in foreign languages (usually French or German). However, this is not always the case, and there is no foreign language requirement for completion of the field.


    View Robin Chapman Stacey's complete profile

Professor Lynn Thomas
Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Africa & the Middle East

    Examines methodological and conceptual issues in the study of sub-Saharan Africa since 1500 focusing on pre-colonial political and social institutions, slavery and the slave trade, European colonialism, anti-colonial resistance and nationalist politics, and postcolonial challenges. Emphasis on exploring the usefulness of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class as analytical categories in African history.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Gender & Comparative Colonialisms)*

    The field in Comparative Gender explores historical scholarship on gender, focusing on 19th- and 20th-century Africa and another period and place of the student's choice, by examining the emergence of women's history; the relationship between Marxism, feminism, and poststructuralism; the framing of gender as a social and symbolic construct; and the analytical intersections between gender, race, sexuality, and class. The field in Comparative Colonialisms approaches European colonialism in Africa and Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries by examining scholarship on the relationship between capitalism and colonialism, violence and the routinization of colonial power, colonial categories of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and gender, and resistance movements and nationalist politics.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Lynn M. Thomas's complete profile

Professor Joel Walker
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Ancient Meditteranean & Late Antique Near East

    A field in Late Antiquity will encompass the history of the Mediterranean and the Near East, 200-750CE, combining a broad general knowledge of the period, with intensive study of at least one region (e.g., North Africa, Syria-Palestine) and two themes chosen to complement student research interests (e.g., hagiography and asceticism, cities, death, burial, and conceptions of the afterlife). Students preparing a field in the History of the Byzantine Empire, 610-1453 CE, may focus on social and cultural history, and the relationship between Byzantine Empire and its neighboring states. In most cases, students will want to include course work in Byzantine art history as part of their preparation for this field. A field in the history of Christianity in the Near East is also possible, covering the period from 500 CE to the present, combining a broad knowledge of the various Christian traditions of the region, with an intensive study of any one tradition (e.g., the Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopic, East or West Syrian Christian traditions), focused on the pre-modern period.

    Division: Africa & the Middle East

    Students may prepare a field in the Islamic Middle East, encompassing the history of the Sasanian and early Islamic Near East, 500-900 CE, combining a broad general knowledge of the period, with intensive study of at least one region (e.g., Egypt, Iraq, Iran), and two overarching themes chosen to complement student research interests.

    Division: Comparative History (Historiography & Comparative Gender)*

    Students preparing a field in Historiography will explore the themes, methods, and theory of hist TAUGHTorical writing in late antiquity. Students will acquire a broad general knowledge of the range of historical writing in late antiquity (200-900 CE): from the classical Greco-Roman tradition represented by writers like Ammianus Marcellinus and Procopius; to the Christian history and chronicle tradition begun by Eusebius of Caesarea; to al-Tabari and the origins of Islamic historiography. Fields in Comparative Gender will encompass the history of gender in early Christianity, from the New Testament to late antiquity (20-600 CE). Students will acquire a broad command of early Christian debates about gender (especially the role of women in the church). Topics examined in the field include sexual renunciation, asceticism, and the legal and social role sof women in the Roman Empire and the early Church.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field


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Professor Adam Warren
Associate Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Latin America

    Students wishing to work on the Latin America field with Professor Warren may focus on any countries in the region and any time periods, although they are particularly encouraged to consider working on mainland Spanish America during the colonial and early postcolonial periods. Special emphasis will be placed on examining and understanding the historiography produced in Latin America itself, and students will be expected to articulate how such literatures differ from the anglophone historiography. With that in mind, reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is encouraged, but not required.

    Division: Comparative History (Comparative Colonialisms & Comparative Ethnicity & Nationalism)*

    The field in Comparative Colonialisms examines scholarship on Spanish and Portuguese colonialism in Latin America. While students may read on a wide range of topics of their choosing, special emphasis will be placed on exploring how the relations between colony and metropolis, the structure and practice of colonial power in the colonies themselves, and the forms of popular political culture prevalent in the colonies changed during the early, mid, and late colonial periods. Topics to be covered may include the broader colonial economic system, peasant and slave labor systems, the invention of the ~SIndian~T and other colonial identities, religious conversion as a tool of colonialism, indigenous and African religious practices, and popular resistance movements. By reading general theoretical literature on colonialism we will also examine the question how does one relate Spanish and Portuguese colonialism in Latin America to later forms of colonial rule elsewhere in the world.

    The field in Comparative Ethnicity and Nationalism examines nation-building processes and the politics of race and ethnicity in Latin America, focusing primarily on the Andean region and Mexico since 1821 while also drawing on literature about Brazil for comparative purposes. Topics may include peasant and Indian nationalism, questions of citizenship and liberal equality for Indians versus the maintenance of colonial legal and political categories of race and caste, debates about the abolition of slavery and national identity, medical scientific research and debates about racial degeneration as a national problem in Latin America, ethnicity and social revolutions, and nativist "indigenista" political movements.

    *Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.


    View Adam Warren's complete profile

Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Ancient Mediterranean & Late Antique Near East

    Students may prepare a field in Ancient Christianity and Society, covering the history of ancient Christianity, its origins, its relation to the history of religions in the Hellenistic, Roman, and late antique periods; the diversity of ancient Christian movements; heresy, orthodoxy, and society.

    **Adjunct professors do not normally supervise first fields.


    View Michael A. Williams's complete profile

Professor Anand Yang
Professor, Chair, College of Arts and Sciences Term Professor
Glennys Young
Professor, Joint Appointment: Jackson School of International Studies, Jon Bridgman Endowed Professor
  • Areas of Graduate Study

    Division: Russia & Central Asia

    Graduate study is offered on a wide range of topics pertaining to the history of Russia and the USSR since 1861. Content of the field is determined through consultation with the professor. Students may choose to focus on a "modern Russia" field from ca. 1861 to 1991 or to prepare a field that focuses only on the Soviet period (1917 to 1991) and its legacy. No matter what the chronological parameters of the field are, students are expected to master basic historiography, reading a common "canon" of core works; but they are also encouraged and expected to prepare specific emphases (e.g., gender, religion, ethnicity and nationalism, foreign policy, to give just a few of many possible thematic examples) that will be useful to them in teaching and/or research. But the specific emphases on which students focus may also be chronological (e.g., the 1940s) or theoretical (e.g., historiography that engages, both positively and critically, with the "new cultural history.")

    Students prepare a field on "modern" or Soviet Russia for different reasons. Such a field will be very helpful for teaching surveys on European and world history. Because the historiography of the Soviet period has become especially innovative since 1991, especially in the way that it has drawn upon a variety of theoretical perspectives, preparing such a field could be of considerable value to those whose primary field of research pertains to other polities shaped by Marxism-Leninism.

    Students will not be expected to read Russian, or other pertinent languages (e.g., Ukrainian, Uzbek, Estonian, among many others) unless their dissertation projects require reading proficiency in one of the languages of the region.


    View Glennys Young's complete profile

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