HSTEU 276 A: Postwar: European History and Film after 1945

Spring 2024
Meeting:
TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm / SMI 211
SLN:
15387
Section Type:
Lecture
Instructor:
THIS COURSE IS NOT ELIGIBLE FOR REGISTRATION BY AUDITORS OR ACCESS STUDENTS.
Syllabus Description (from Canvas):

Prof. Jordanna Bailkin (she/her) - bailkin@uw.edu

Spring 2024

Smith 211

T, Th 10:30-12:20

Professor Bailkin's office hours: Wednesdays, 2:30-3:20, Smith 218D

 

TA: Sally Sergeleng (she/her)

Sally's office hours: Tuesdays, 2:30-3:20, Smith 204E

 

Welcome to HSTEU 276!

How did Europeans attempt to come to terms with the aftermath and legacy of the Second World War? As they sought to rebuild their cities, laws, empires, economies, and social relations in the wake of the war, the place of Europe in the world seemed ever more fragile. In this course, we will explore efforts to reconstruct Europe and European identity after 1945, as well as assessing the successes and failures of these efforts. We will address the themes of poverty and affluence, postwar justice, Americanization, the expansion and collapse of communism, decolonization, migration, and ongoing ethnic tensions that threatened new forms of warfare.

Throughout this tumultuous period, film offered a powerful way for Europeans to rethink their identity. We will focus on films that illustrate how Europe tried to memorialize (and forget) the wartime past, and what arguments Europeans made about how they might build a new future. The course thus provides students with an opportunity to explore the historical uses of film, and to sharpen their skills of visual analysis, along with an overview of key themes in post-1945 European history.

Films will include Roberto Rossellini's Germany Year Zero, Wolfgang Becker's Goodbye, Lenin, Stephen Frears' Dirty Pretty Things, and Quentin Tarentino's Inglourious Basterds. Readings include Primo Levi's Reawakening, Frantz Fanon's A Dying Colonialism, and Slavenka Drakulic's Cafe Europa:  Life After Communism.

Assignments will include a midterm, final exam, and 7-8 page paper.

The syllabus, discussion questions, readings, and films are linked through the weekly modules.

Catalog Description:
Explores efforts to reconstruct Europe and European identity after 1945. Assesses the successes and failures of these efforts. Addresses themes of poverty and affluence, postwar justice, Americanization, expansion and collapse of communism, decolonization, migration, and ongoing ethnic tensions that threatened new forms of warfare. Explores the history uses of film.
GE Requirements Met:
Diversity (DIV)
Social Sciences (SSc)
Arts and Humanities (A&H)
Writing (W)
Credits:
5.0
Status:
Active
Last updated:
June 11, 2024 - 7:58 pm