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HSTAS 590 A: Topics in History

Meeting Time: 
TTh 4:00pm - 5:20pm
Location: 
* *
SLN: 
16283
Joint Sections: 
JSIS A 588 A
Instructor:
James Lin photograph
James Lin

Syllabus Description:

Syllabus for JSIS 588/HSTAS 590
Making Modern Taiwan: History, Politics, Society, and Culture
Fall 2020
Tu Th 4:00-5:20pm
Remote via Microsoft Teams
Rev. September 23, 2020

Jackson School of International Studies
Professor James Lin
Pronouns: he/him
jyslin@uw.edu
Office Hours: Wed 3-4pm (remote via Microsoft Teams) and by appointment

Description:

This graduate reading seminar is an interdisciplinary survey of Taiwan Studies.  It aims to introduce graduate students to key themes that have defined Taiwanese history, politics, society, and culture.  How has Taiwan been shaped by colonialism, geography, and peoples?  How have these forces resulted in key issues today such as identity, democratization, and cross-Strait relations?  How has Taiwan imagined the world and its own place within it?

Each week we will discuss key issues in Taiwanese history, including migration, colonialism, ethnic identity, urban spaces, the Cold War, development, business, labor, and gender.  Recent and classic monographs and articles from history, anthropology, economics, political science, sociology, geography, literature, cultural studies, and gender studies will serve as case studies and interpretive frameworks for major issues in contemporary and historical Taiwan.

By the end of the course students should be able to critically analyze historical events using lenses for both the local and the global to understand historical context and contingencies.  Furthermore, this course will also seek to build professional skills used in academia and outside, and thus will provide assignments in critical responses, peer review, oral presentation, and research.

Remote Learning during COVID-19:

This course will be run synchronously as a seminar.  This means that everyone will assemble for weekly discussions on our video platform at the assigned course times.

The purpose of an advanced reading seminar is to allow create intensive discussions of the readings as a group, as further explained below (see Assignments).

That said, we are in extraordinary times, and synchronous class sessions will be difficult for many.  Some of us will face unseen burdens, such as caretaking responsibilities or illness, that may affect the ability to participate in synchronous discussion.  If this is the case, please let me know ASAP so that we can arrange alternative asynchronous options on an individual basis.  Moreover, please do not hesitate to let me know if you are experiencing responsibilities or hardships outside of class that will affect in-class performance.

Remote Education Etiquette

Though we will be using an online video platform as our medium, we are still nonetheless in a classroom environment where a learning conducive environment is our highest priority.  Because of this, please try to follow these guidelines:

  • Utilize the “raise hand” feature when you would like to join the conversation. If there are multiple raised hands, I will try my best to order who speaks based on who raises their hand first.
  • Please mute your microphone when not speaking.
  • However, please leave your camera on whenever it is feasible. As an instructor, seeing facial cues helps me see if the discussion needs to be slowed down, if something needs further explanation, etc.  Feel free to use appropriate virtual backgrounds.

Assignments:

  1. Readings

Each week, students will be expected to have read the weekly assignments, usually a book monograph and an article, and come to class prepared to discuss the readings.  Active participation in the discussion demonstrates having completed the reading assignments, and thus discussion constitutes a significant portion of the final grade.

During Week 6, students will be assigned a midterm discussion grade.  This will reflect ongoing performance, and substandard discussion grades at the midterm should serve as notice to increase participation in discussion.

  1. Response papers

By the end of the course, students will need to submit 5 response papers on required readings.  Each week (except Week 1), due Monday at 11:59pm, students can submit a short paper (700 to 900 words) in response to the readings.  This response paper will attempt to critically respond to, or discuss, one or several aspects of the assigned monograph (and articles, where applicable).

Since this paper is short, it should include a very brief, one to two sentence summary of the author(s’) argument.  The main focus should be on critiquing, analyzing, contextualizing, and/or otherwise critically engaging with the reading.  Papers will be posted as graded responses to discussions on Canvas.  A separate handout will be distributed and discussed during the first class with additional details and a sample response paper.

After posting your response to Canvas, please read the responses from other students and come prepared to discuss your thoughts about all the responses in seminar.

  1. Discussion leader and additional responses

Each student will be assigned two weeks for which he/she will be responsible for leading discussion and presenting on optional readings.  As part of this responsibility, every student will choose one of the optional readings (we will do this as a group during our first meeting) to read and present to other course members.  Ten minutes will be dedicated to summarizing and contextualizing the optional reading and answering questions from other students.

Additional response papers for each of these optional readings will be required as well, to make a total of 7 response papers for the quarter.

  1. Peer review

In Week 4, every student will write 600 to 800 word reviews of two peers from the prior week (Week 3).  The peer reviews should evaluate critical responses on how effective the response paper is at accomplishing the goals outlined by the assignment in the section above.  Furthermore, peer reviews should also engage with the ideas presented by the author and can expand upon them where appropriate.  Two peer reviews will be automatically assigned to each student in Canvas and peer reviews should also be posted directly in Canvas.  Please note these peer reviews will not be anonymous.

  1. Final prospectus paper

Finally, students will write a 4000 to 5000 word paper, modeled as a research prospectus, on a topic of their choosing in consultation with the instructor.  The research prospectus will outline a research question or issue and 1) discuss the importance of answering this question, 2) propose a methodology for approaching it, and 3) explain how the proposed research project fits into the current scholarly literature and debates.  Possible topics may derive from or be related to one of the weekly topics, or a different topic altogether; they do not need to be historical, and can utilize any disciplinary or cross-disciplinary approach.  A handout with further details will be provided in class.

By Week 5, students will need to propose a research topic or question and body of literature to the instructor.  In the final week, each student will make a brief, three-minute presentation of the research prospectus (followed by a five-minute Q&A session).  The final prospectus paper will be due during the assigned final examination time (time and date below).

Grading:

Weekly discussions

26% (13% first half; 13% second half)

Weekly response papers

35% (5% per paper: 5 self-chosen, plus 2 assigned discussion readings)

Assigned discussion & reading

10% (5% per week)

Peer reviews

4% (2% each)

Prospectus paper

25%

Course policies: 

  • Remote Learning

Faculty members at U.S. universities – including the University of Washington – have the right to academic freedom which includes presenting and exploring topics and content that other governments may consider to be illegal and, therefore, choose to censor. Examples may include topics and content involving religion, gender and sexuality, human rights, democracy and representative government, and historic events.

If, as a UW student, you are living outside of the United States while taking courses remotely, you are subject to the laws of your local jurisdiction. Local authorities may limit your access to course material and take punitive action towards you. Unfortunately, the University of Washington has no authority over the laws in your jurisdictions or how local authorities enforce those laws.

If you are taking UW courses outside of the United States, you have reason to exercise caution when enrolling in courses that cover topics and issues censored in your jurisdiction. If you have concerns regarding a course or courses that you have registered for, please contact your academic advisor who will assist you in exploring options.

  • Plagiarism and academic integrity

All work that is submitted as part of a class assignment must be entirely your own. The penalty for academic dishonesty will be an F for the entire course. Instances of plagiarism will be reported to the Dean of Undergraduate Academic Affairs and the JSIS Office of Undergraduate Studies according to rules outlined by the University of Washington Code of Student Conduct: https://www.washington.edu/cssc

  • Access and Accommodations

If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to me at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course. If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or disability.uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions.  Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS.  It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.

  • Inclusivity

Our classroom is a safe space for all students regardless of race, age, gender identity, sexual orientation, size, religion, or political affiliation. Please feel comfortable and welcome to approach me with any concerns you may have about these issues. If you’d prefer that I call you by a specific name/pronoun, please let me know. In all cases, students’ preferences of address will be honored.  All students in the classroom are expected to treat each other with respect and tolerance.

Readings:

Below is a list of required readings.  Due to COVID-19, the majority of our readings are available as ebooks.  Only one book (Szonyi) needs to be purchased due to its unavailability on ebook format.  That single book can be purchased through Amazon or an online retailer of your choice.

Articles and ebooks need to be accessed via UW Library proxy or VPN. I have embedded URLs below for your convenience, which should route you through the library proxy automatically (you will be prompted to log in with your NetID if not logged in already).  If any embedded link does not work, you will need to open the ebook through the proxy yourself. For help with this, please visit https://www.lib.washington.edu/help/connect

For book chapters that are not available as ebooks, I will upload PDFs to the “Files” section of Canvas.  These are marked below as “PDF on Canvas.”

Books that need to be purchased:

  • Szonyi, Michael. Cold War Island: Quemoy on the Front Line.  Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Required books:

  • Allen, Joseph. Taipei: City of Displacements.  University of Washington Press, 2011. (ebook)
  • Andrade, Tonio. How Taiwan Became Chinese: Dutch, Spanish, and Han Colonization in the Seventeenth Century. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. (ebook)
  • Barclay, Paul D. Outcasts of Empire: Japan’s Rule on Taiwan’s “Savage Border,” 1874-1945. University of California Press, 2017. (ebook via UC Luminos)
  • Brown, Melissa. Is Taiwan Chinese?: The Impact of Culture, Power, and Migration on Changing Identities. University of California Press, 2004. (ebook)
  • Ching, Leo. “Becoming Japanese”: Colonial Taiwan and the Politics of Identity Formation.  University of California Press, 2001. (ebook)
  • Dawley, Evan. Becoming Taiwanese: Ethnogenesis in a Colonial City, 1880s to 1950s. Harvard University Asia Center, 2019. (ebook)
  • Gold, Tom. State and Society in the Taiwan Miracle. M.E. Sharpe, 1986. (PDF on Canvas)
  • Glassman, Jim. Drums of War, Drums of Development: The Formation of a Pacific Ruling Class and Industrial Transformation in East and Southeast Asia, 1945-1980. Brill, 2018. (PDF on Canvas)
  • Hart, Gillian Patricia. Disabling Globalization: Places of Power in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. (PDF on Canvas)
  • Hamilton, Gary, and Kao Cheng-shu. Making Money: How Taiwanese Industrialists Embraced the Global Economy. Stanford University Press, 2017. (ebook)
  • Ho, Ming-sho. Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2019. (ebook)
  • Lan, Pei-Chia. Global Cinderellas: Migrant Domestics and Newly Rich Employers in Taiwan. Durham, NC: Duke University Press Books, 2006. (ebook)
  • Lan, Pei-Chia. Raising Global Families: Parenting, Immigration, and Class in Taiwan and the US. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2018. (ebook).
  • Looney, Kristen E. Mobilizing for Development: The Modernization of Rural East Asia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2020. (ebook)
  • Martin, Jeffrey T. Sentiment, Reason, and Law: Policing in the Republic of China on Taiwan. Ithaca New York: Cornell University Press, 2019. (ebook)
  • Masuda, Hajimu. Cold War Crucible: The Korean Conflict and the Postwar World. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2015. (ebook)
  • Phillips, Steven E. Between Assimilation and Independence: The Taiwanese Encounter Nationalist China, 1945-1950. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 2003 (PDF on Canvas)
  • Shepherd, John Robert. Statecraft and Political Economy on the Taiwan Frontier, 1600-1800. Stanford University Press, 1993. (ebook)
  • Strauss, Julia C. State Formation in China and Taiwan: Bureaucracy, Campaign, and Performance. Cambridge University Press, 2019. (ebook)
  • Teng, Emma. Taiwan's Imagined Geography: Chinese Colonial Travel Writing and Pictures, 1683-1895. Harvard East Asian Monographs, 2006. (ebook)
  • Wade, Robert. Governing the Market: Economic Theory and the Role of Government in East Asian Industrialization.  Princeton University Press, 1990. (ebook)
  • Yang, Dominic Meng-Hsuan. The Great Exodus from China: Trauma, Memory, and Identity in Modern Taiwan. Cambridge University Press, 2020. (ebook)

Recommended books:

  • Andrade, Tonio. Lost Colony: The Untold Story of China’s First Great Victory over the West. Princeton University Press, 2013.
  • Blundell, David, ed. Taiwan Since Martial Law. Taipei: National Taiwan University Press, 2012.
  • Chiang, Howard, and Yin Wang. Perverse Taiwan. Routledge, 2016.
  • Fell, Dafydd. Government and Politics in Taiwan. London; New York: Routledge, 2012.
  • Fell, Dafydd. Party Politics in Taiwan: Party Change and the Democratic Evolution of Taiwan, 1991-2004. Reprint edition. London: Routledge, 2012.
  • Greene, Megan. The Origins of the Developmental State in Taiwan. Harvard University Press, 2008.
  • Hang, Xing. Conflict and Commerce in Maritime East Asia: The Zheng Family and the Shaping of the Modern World, c.1620-1720. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2016.
  • Heylen, Ann. Japanese Models, Chinese Culture and the Dilemma of Taiwanese Language Reform. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2012.
  • Hsiau, A-Chin. Contemporary Taiwanese Cultural Nationalism. London: Routledge, 2000.
  • Hsing, You-tien. Making Capitalism in China: The Taiwan Connection. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Hsiung, Ping-Chun. 1996. Living Rooms as Factories: Class, Gender, and the Satellite Factory System in Taiwan. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
  • Huang, Hans Tao-Ming. Queer Politics and Sexual Modernity in Taiwan. Hong Kong University Press, 2011.
  • Kleeman, Faye Yuan. Under an Imperial Sun: Japanese Colonial Literature of Taiwan and the South. University of Hawaii Press, 2003.
  • Lin, Hsiao-Ting. Accidental State: Chiang Kai-shek, the United States, and the Making of Taiwan. Harvard University Press, 2016.
  • Lin, Syaru Shirley. Taiwan’s China Dilemma: Contested Identities and Multiple Interests in Taiwan’s Cross-Strait Economic Policy. Stanford University Press, 2016.
  • Lo, Ming-cheng Miriam. Doctors Within Borders: Profession, Ethnicity, and Modernity in Colonial Taiwan. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 2002.
  • Madsen, Richard. Democracy’s Dharma: Religious Renaissance and Political Development in Taiwan.: University of California Press, 2007.
  • Martin, Fran. Situating Sexualities: Queer Representation in Taiwanese Fiction, Film, and Public Culture. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2003.
  • Meskill, Johanna Menzel. A Chinese Pioneer Family: The Lins of Wu-Feng, Taiwan, 1729-1895. Reprint edition. Princeton University Press, 2017. (Or 1990 edition, also from Princeton UP)
  • Morris, Andrew. Colonial Project, National Game: A History of Baseball in Taiwan. University of California Press, 2010.
  • Read, Benjamin. Roots of the State: Neighborhood Organization and Social Networks in Beijing and Taipei. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2012.
  • Rigger, Shelley. Politics in Taiwan: Voting for Democracy. Routledge, 1999. (Available as ebook)
  • Tucker, Nancy. Strait Talk: United States-Taiwan Relations and the Crisis with China. Harvard University Press, 2011.
  • Wen-hsin Yeh ed., Mobile Horizons: Dynamics Across the Taiwan Strait. Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley, 2013.

Weekly Topics and Readings:

 

Week 1, 10/1: Introduction

 

Assign weekly discussion leaders and optional readings

Discuss final research prospectus papers

(No response paper for this week)

 

What does it mean to study Taiwan?

  • Shih, Shu-mei, Mark Harrison, Kuei-fen Chiu, and Michael Berry. “Forum 2: Linking Taiwan Studies with the World.” International Journal of Taiwan Studies 1, no. 1 (February 20, 2018): 209–27. (article)

 

Week 2, 10/6 & 10/8: Colony and Empire

 

What does it mean to be colonized?  How can a colonial past affect a society’s present?

  • Andrade, Tonio. How Taiwan Became Chinese: Dutch, Spanish, and Han Colonization in the Seventeenth Century. Columbia University Press, 2008. Introduction, Chapter 1, 6-9 (pp. 1-39, 115-207). (ebook)
  • Shepherd, John Robert. Statecraft and Political Economy on the Taiwan Frontier, 1600-1800. Stanford University Press, 1993. Chapter 1, 6 (pp. 1-24, 137-177). (ebook)
  • Teng, Emma. Taiwan's Imagined Geography: Chinese Colonial Travel Writing and Pictures, 1683-1895. Harvard East Asian Monographs, 2006. Introduction, Chapters 1-2 (pp. 1-80). (ebook)
  • Vickers, Edward. “Original Sin on the Island Paradise? Qing Taiwan’s Colonial History in Comparative Perspective.” Taiwan in Comparative Perspective 2 (2008): 65–86. (article)

Recommended Reading:

  • Andrade, Tonio. Lost Colony: The Untold Story of China’s First Great Victory over the West. Princeton University Press, 2013.
  • Shepherd, John Robert. Statecraft and Political Economy on the Taiwan Frontier, 1600-1800. Stanford University Press, 1993. (Rest of book)
  • Hang, Xing. Conflict and Commerce in Maritime East Asia: The Zheng Family and the Shaping of the Modern World, c.1620-1720. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2016.

 

Week 3, 10/13 & 15: Identity

 

Mandatory Response Paper

What does it mean to be “Taiwanese”?  What are the commonalities, differences, and origins of different identity markers, such as race, ethnicity, language, ancestry, heritage, biology (DNA and genotypes), nation, civilization, culture, etc.?  How does identity change and how is it co-opted?

  • Brown, Melissa. Is Taiwan Chinese?: The Impact of Culture, Power, and Migration on Changing Identities. University of California Press, 2004. Chapter 1, 3 (pp. 1-34, 66-133). (ebook)
  • Ching, Leo. “Becoming Japanese”: Colonial Taiwan and the Politics of Identity Formation.  University of California Press, 2001. Introduction, Chapters 1, 2 (pp. 1-88). (ebook)
  • Dawley, Evan. Becoming Taiwanese: Ethnogenesis in a Colonial City, 1880s to 1950s. Harvard University Asia Center, 2019. Introduction, Chapter 2 (pp. 1-26, 78-118). (ebook)

Recommended reading:

  • Heylen, Ann. Japanese Models, Chinese Culture and the Dilemma of Taiwanese Language Reform. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2012.
  • Kleeman, Faye Yuan. Under an Imperial Sun: Japanese Colonial Literature of Taiwan and the South. University of Hawaii Press, 2003.
  • Lo, Ming-cheng Miriam. Doctors Within Borders: Profession, Ethnicity, and Modernity in Colonial Taiwan. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 2002.
  • Morris, Andrew. Colonial Project, National Game: A History of Baseball in Taiwan. University of California Press, 2010.

 

Week 4, 10/20 & 10/22: Indigeneity

 

 Response Paper Peer Review

How have indigenous experiences differed from settler colonial experiences?

  • Barclay, Paul D. Outcasts of Empire: Japan’s Rule on Taiwan’s “Savage Border,” 1874-1945. University of California Press, 2017. (ebook via UC Luminos)
  • Ching, Leo. “Becoming Japanese”: Colonial Taiwan and the Politics of Identity Formation.  University of California Press, 2001. Chapter 4 (pp. 133-173). (ebook)

Recommended reading:

  • Katz, Paul R. When Valleys Turned Blood Red: The Ta-Pa-Ni Incident in Colonial Taiwan. University of Hawai’i Press, 2005.

 

Week 5, 10/27 & 10/29: City

 

Peer reviews due

Two-minute introduction of research projects

How do urban and built spaces reflect the social circumstances surrounding them?

  • Allen, Joseph. Taipei: City of Displacements.  University of Washington Press, 2011. Please read the Postface first. (ebook)
  • Musgrove, Charles D. “Taking Back Space: The Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall and Taiwan’s Democratization.” Twentieth-Century China 42, no. 3 (October 11, 2017): 297–316. (article)

 

Week 6, 11/3 & 11/5: State

 

What was the relationship of the Nationalist state with Taiwan society?  How might the Nationalist state-building project be “decolonization as recolonization”?

  • Dawley, Evan. Becoming Taiwanese: Ethnogenesis in a Colonial City, 1880s to 1950s. Harvard University Asia Center, 2019. Chapters 6, 7 (pp. 247-330). (ebook)
  • Liao, Wen-shuo. “Exhibiting Chineseness: The Taiwan Provincial Exposition 1948.” Twentieth-Century China. Volume 37, Issue: 3, Oct 2012, pp. 183 – 203. (article)
  • Phillips, Steven E. Between Assimilation and Independence: The Taiwanese Encounter Nationalist China, 1945-1950. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 2003. Chapters 1, 4, 5 (pp. 1-15, 64-114). (PDF on Canvas)
  • Strauss, Julia C. State Formation in China and Taiwan: Bureaucracy, Campaign, and Performance. Cambridge University Press, 2019. Introduction, Chapter 4, 5 (pp. 1-33, 168-242). (ebook)
  • Yang, Dominic Meng-Hsuan. The Great Exodus from China: Trauma, Memory, and Identity in Modern Taiwan. Cambridge University Press, 2020. Chapter 2 (pp. 86-126). (ebook)

Recommended Reading:

  • Phillips, Steven E. Between Assimilation and Independence: The Taiwanese Encounter Nationalist China, 1945-1950. Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 2003. (Rest of book)
  • Strauss, Julia C. State Formation in China and Taiwan: Bureaucracy, Campaign, and Performance. Cambridge University Press, 2019. (Rest of book)

 

Week 7, 11/10 & 11/12: The Cold War

 

What was the Cold War?  How did it affect every day, lived experiences of people living in places like Kinmen and Taiwan?

  • Szonyi, Michael. Cold War Island: Quemoy on the Front Line.  Cambridge University Press, 2008.
  • Masuda, Hajimu. Cold War Crucible: The Korean Conflict and the Postwar World. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2015. Introduction, Chapter 10 (pp. 1-10, 258-280). (ebook)

Recommended Reading:

  • Lin, Hsiao-Ting. Accidental State: Chiang Kai-shek, the United States, and the Making of Taiwan. Harvard University Press, 2016.
  • Tucker, Nancy. Strait Talk: United States-Taiwan Relations and the Crisis with China. Harvard University Press, 2011.

 

Week 8, 11/17 & 11/19: Development and Capitalism

 

How did Taiwan become an economic “miracle”?  What are the different theories and interpretations for explaining its miracle? What are the consequences of this?

  • Gold, Tom. State and Society in the Taiwan Miracle. M.E. Sharpe, 1986. Chapters 1, 5-6 (pp. 3-20, 56-96). (PDF on Canvas)
  • Glassman, Jim. Drums of War, Drums of Development: The Formation of a Pacific Ruling Class and Industrial Transformation in East and Southeast Asia, 1945-1980. Brill, 2018. Introduction (pp. 1-19) and pp. 381-413 (first section of Chapter 5). (PDF on Canvas)
  • Hamilton, Gary, and Kao Cheng-shu. Making Money: How Taiwanese Industrialists Embraced the Global Economy. Stanford University Press, 2017. Introduction, Chapters 3-4 (pp. 1-19, 58-99). (ebook)
  • Hart, Gillian Patricia. Disabling Globalization: Places of Power in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. Introduction, Chapter 5 (pp. 1-15, 165-197). (PDF on Canvas)
  • Looney, Kristen E. Mobilizing for Development: The Modernization of Rural East Asia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2020. Introduction, Chapter 2 (pp. 1-13, 49-79). (ebook).
  • Wade, Robert. Governing the Market: Economic Theory and the Role of Government in East Asian Industrialization.  Princeton University Press, 1990.  Introduction, Chapter 1 (pp. 3-33). (ebook).

Recommended Reading:

  • Greene, Megan. The Origins of the Developmental State in Taiwan. Harvard University Press, 2008.
  • Hsing, You-tien. Making Capitalism in China: The Taiwan Connection. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Kirby, William. “Global Business Across the Taiwan Strait: The Case of the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Limited” in Wen-hsin Yeh ed., Mobile Horizons: Dynamics Across the Taiwan Strait. Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley, 2013. pp. 178-208.
  • Toner, Simon. “Imagining Taiwan: The Nixon Administration, the Developmental States, and South Vietnam’s Search for Economic Viability, 1969–1975.” Diplomatic History 41, no. 4 (September 1, 2017): 772–98.

 

Weeks 9 and 10, 11/24 & 12/1: Democracy and Society

 

What issues are faced by maturing democracies?  How has Taiwan’s experience with democracy differed from other democracies?

  • For 11/24:

    • Martin, Jeffrey T. Sentiment, Reason, and Law: Policing in the Republic of China on Taiwan. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 2019. Introduction, Chapters 2-6 (1-10, 33-148). (ebook)

    For 12/1:

    • Ho, Ming-sho. Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement. Temple University Press, 2019. Introduction, Chapters 1, 4, 7 (pp. 1-39, 95-116, 176-208) (ebook)

Recommended Reading:

  • Hsiau, A-Chin. Contemporary Taiwanese Cultural Nationalism. London: Routledge, 2000.
  • Lin, Syaru Shirley. Taiwan’s China Dilemma: Contested Identities and Multiple Interests in Taiwan’s Cross-Strait Economic Policy. Stanford University Press, 2016.
  • Madsen, Richard. Democracy’s Dharma: Religious Renaissance and Political Development in Taiwan. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007.
  • McAllister, Ian. “Democratic Consolidation in Taiwan in Comparative Perspective.” Asian Journal of Comparative Politics 1, no. 1 (March 1, 2016): 44–61.
  • Read, Benjamin. Roots of the State: Neighborhood Organization and Social Networks in Beijing and Taipei. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2012.
  • Rigger, Shelley. Politics in Taiwan: Voting for Democracy. Routledge, 1999. Select chapters.

 

12/3: Presentations 

5 minute presentations of research projects & 5 minute Q&A

 

Week 11, 12/8 & 12/10: Gender, Labor, and Migration

 

How do gender, labor, and migration interact in the experience of Southeast Asian domestic workers in Taiwan?  For middle class Taiwanese families with children?  What are the power differentials in these relationships?

  • Lan, Pei-Chia. Global Cinderellas: Migrant Domestics and Newly Rich Employers in Taiwan. Duke University Press, 2006. (ebook)
  • Lan, Pei-Chia. Raising Global Families: Parenting, Immigration, and Class in Taiwan and the US. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2018. Chapter 3 (ebook).

Recommended Reading:

  • Chiang, Howard, and Yin Wang. Perverse Taiwan. Routledge, 2016. (Available as free ebook)
  • Hsiung, Ping-Chun. 1996. Living Rooms as Factories: Class, Gender, and the Satellite Factory System in Taiwan. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
  • Lee, Anru. In the Name of Harmony and Prosperity: Labor and Gender Politics in Taiwan’s Economic Restructuring. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2004.
  • Martin, Fran. Situating Sexualities: Queer Representation in Taiwanese Fiction, Film, and Public Culture. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2003.

 

December 15, 11:59PM: Prospectus Paper Due

Catalog Description: 
Seminar on selected topics in general history, with special emphasis on preparation for field examinations. Topics vary according to interests of students and instructor.
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
August 4, 2020 - 9:13pm
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