You are here

HSTRY 388 A: Colloquium: Introduction To History

Meeting Time: 
W 12:30pm - 3:20pm
Location: 
SAV 140
SLN: 
16254
Instructor:
James Gregory
James Gregory

Syllabus Description:

 Professor James Gregory
312B Smith
Office hours: Tuesday 3:30-4:30 and by appointment
gregoryj@uw.edu

American Social Movements Since 1900:
from Woman Suffrage to White Nationalism

Social movements are a key feature of American politics. Especially since the start of the 20th century, certain social movements have been highly influential, reshaping ideas and political life, achieving major changes in law and policy, in some cases rearranging rules of race, gender, and economy. Others have been much less effective. This course explores the dynamics and the history of social movements of many kinds seeking to understand how they work and how they achieve influence. Moving chronologically, we will explore the Industrial Workers of the World, the Ku Klux Klan, and Woman Suffrage movements from the early decades of the 20th Century, then unemployed movements in the 1930s, civil rights movements from the 1950s-1970s, ending with two recent social movements: the Fight for Fifteen campaign based in Seattle and SeaTac and the organized racist movements that have been active since the 1990s.

Grades will be based on class discussion and on four writing assignments. Three involve short responses to the readings. The fourth requires outside research and must be at least 8 pages in length. This research paper will focus on a social movement of your choice with research based both on primary and secondary sources. One of the resources we will use at various points is the Mapping American Social Movements Through the 20th Century Project, a digital history center based in the UW Department of History. http://depts.washington.edu/moves/

Readings: Two books are available at University Bookstore: Nancy MacLean, Behind the Mask of Chivalry; Jonathan Rosenblum, BEYOND $15. Kathleen M. Blee, Inside Organized Racism is available as an E-book from UW Library. The rest of the assigned readings are combined in a course packet available at Ram Copy (4144 University Ave).

Schedule

SEPTEMBER 27: INTRODUCTIONS

In-class exercises

OCTOBER 4: INDUSTRIAL WORKERS OF THE WORLD

Read Robert Goldberg, Grassroots Resistance: Social Movements in Twentieth Century America (1991) pp.41-64 (in course packet). Explore the IWW History Project http://depts.washington.edu/iww/ . Read several essays and examine the maps of IWW actions and IWW locals. Upload a 2-page response: What do you learn about IWW geography from the maps? Do the maps and data challenge or modify anything Goldberg says?

OCTOBER 11: WOMAN SUFFRAGE MOVEMENTS

Read Lee Ann Banaszak, Why Movements Succeed or Fail: Opportunity, Culture and the Struggle for Woman Suffrage (Princeton University Press, 1996) pp. 3-43 (in course packet). Examine the components of “National Woman’s Party History and Geography” on The Mapping American Social Movements Project site: http://depts.washington.edu/moves/NWP_intro.shtml

Share preliminary ideas about research paper topics

OCTOBER 18: KU KLUX KLAN

Read Nancy MacLean, Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (Oxford University Press, 1994), all chapters. Upload 2-page summary and discussion of her key arguments.

OCTOBER 25:  POOR PEOPLE’S MOVEMENTS

Read Francis Fox Piven and Richard A. Cloward, Poor People’s Movements: Why they Succeed, How They Fail (1979),  pp.xix-xxiv, 1-95 (in course packet).Read Robert Goldberg, Grassroots Resistance: Social Movements in Twentieth Century America, pp. 7-17 (handout from first meeting). Upload a 1-2-page explanation of Piven and Cloward’s theory of social movement success and failure.

NOVEMBER 1:  BLACK FREEDOM MOVEMENTS

Read Manning Marable, Race, Reform, and Rebellion: The Second Reconstruction in Black America, 1945-1990, (1991), pp. 61-148, 220-230 (in course packet)

NOVEMBER 8:

Oral reports: research papers preliminary progress

NOVEMBER 15: THE FIGHT FOR FIFTEEN

Read Jonathan Rosenblum, BEYOND $15: Immigrant Workers, Faith Activists, and the Revival of the Labor Movement (Beacon Press, 2017), all chapters.

NOVEMBER 22: NO CLASS

NOVEMBER 29: ORGANIZED RACISM

Read Kathleen M. Blee, Inside Organized Racism: Women in the Hate Movement (University of California Press, 2002) pp 1-72, 111-192.

DECEMBER 6:

Oral reports with power points:  research papers

 

Catalog Description: 
Introduction to the discipline of history for new or prospective majors. Emphasizes the basic skills of reading, analysis, and communication (both verbal and written) that are central to the historian's craft. Each seminar discusses a different subject or problem.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Writing (W)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
January 10, 2018 - 9:33pm
Share